Aug
10

Moms Forum: How to get baby to drink water, juice?

Posted by besttech

McClatchy-Tribune

Moms Forum spotlights useful discussion taking place on the parenting forums of newspapers around the country.

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QUESTION: My daughter is 9 months old and will not drink water or juice. She doesn’t even like taking a bottle anymore — she just breastfeeds. It’s starting to get hot, and I’d like to get her to drink some fluids! She doesn’t even want to take breast milk from a bottle or sippy cup. I’ve tried water in a bottle, sippy cup, regular cup with a straw — nothing. She will maybe take a sip and then make a face and doesn’t want it. I’ve tried different kinds of juices, diluted juice with water, and I’ve tried all these things at room temperature, out of the refrigerator and warmed up. Nothing is working! Any advice?

— Posted by jkent877 at www.trianglemom2mom.com

RESPONSES:

— My daughter never even took a bottle and wasn’t crazy about sippy cups either. I did have some success with those mesh bag things (like this but I think I used a different brand from Babies R Us – http://www.babysafefeeder.com/home10.htm). I’d fill it with an ice cube, frozen juice or fruit (which has a lot of water in it). We also would get applesauce in tubes – (http://www.walnutacres.com/snack—overview.php – available at whole foods) and freeze them. It’s messy, but it might work!

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Aug
08

DVD makes `the talk’ easier

Posted by besttech

Catherine Mallette McClatchy Newspapers

“My First Period Kit & DVD,” by Dr. Chrystal de Freitas

What it is: A DVD that tackles the possibly uncomfortable subjects of puberty, conception, sexual intercourse and menstruation. De Freitas is a pediatrician and mom and has presented her Healthy Chats for Girls seminars for 15 years. This DVD is one of those seminars. In it, she gathers a group of moms and daughters and presents information in a factual, mature yet non-scary way. The kit includes a short informational pamphlet for parents, a purple butterfly purse for storing pads, a rubber butterfly bracelet and a one-year Healthy Chats online subscription.

Why buy it: Even if you’re the kind of parent who already feels comfortable talking with your child about these subjects, this DVD covers a lot of ground and will undoubtedly make your own conversations with your kid more valuable. (You’ll learn stuff, too: For example, did you know that the average woman starts off with about 400,000 eggs?)

How much: $19.95

Where to get it: www.myfirstperiodkit.com and amazon.com

Aug
06

Hey Mom: Life’s no romance novel

Posted by besttech

Susan Callahan, Anne Nolan and Katrin Schumann

The following is an excerpt from “Mothers Need Time-Outs, Too” by Susan Callahan, Anne, Nolen and Katrin Schumann (copyright 2008). Reprinted with permission from The McGraw-Hill Companies, www.mhprofessional.com.

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Are you one of those well-meaning mothers who over-services her children, always assessing, planning, organizing, worrying? Do you focus so much attention on your kids and your home that you sometimes forget about that guy over there in the corner? You know the one we mean — your husband?

There’s another very real casualty of hovering mothering (aside from the mom herself and the children) and that’s the husband. We’re all focusing so much attention on our kids, making up for time when we’re at work or frantically trying to be the best, most diligent moms we can be, that it’s easy to slip into the mode of practically ignoring the men in our lives. Or only paying attention to them when they irritate us, which seems to happen all too often.

How couples operate can be pretty mysterious. What works for one is disastrous for another. Ever been away on a trip with another couple and wondered how on earth they manage? Observing someone else’s rhythms, watching the give and take (or just the give!) and wondering how they can stand each other’s foibles can be very illuminating!

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Aug
04

Things I’ve learned from (and love about) beach house week

Posted by besttech

Leslie Postal OrlandoSentinel.com/momsatwork

My annual family beach week vacation starts Friday. At the moment, I am sitting at my desk, eating my lunch and pondering the things I still need for said trip (birthday gift for nephew, library books for my kids) and all the things I must pack by Friday morning. I am feeling a little frazzled.

But I am trying to focus on the good, the peaceful, the fun. The things I love about beach house week:

1. The beach and boogie boards: Of course, the beach is wonderful place for kids, a giant sandbox, an endless opportunity for water play. Boogie boards just add to the fun. Little kids love that they are “surfing,” bigger ones love that they can ride the waves, and grownups love that even if they may never succeed on a real surf board (yours truly tried once and was very bad), they can still get a little rush, a little care-free fun (even if they do look quite undignified in the process).

2. Glow sticks — A number of years ago I got the idea to bring along glow sticks. Wow. What a hit. So now every year, I grab a stash. And one night during the week, we gather up the kids, hand out the glow sticks and head to the dark beach for an eerie, day-glow delight. Even the pre-teens have fun.

3. Fruity drinks — Well who doesn’t like an icy blender concoction after a day in the sun? It’s become our drink of choice, the blender everyone’s favorite appliance. Some among us have discovered (not me, I swear) that if, by chance, you are out of mixers (and it is late), you can steal the kids’ Popsicles, push them off the sticks and into the blender, and voila, more fruity drinks. For the truly desperate, of course.

4. Bocce ball — My cousins get credit for this one, as they started bringing their bocce ball set along quite a few years ago. It’s a game of skill and strategy, apparently, but it’s also a simple game that involves throwing balls. A clear patch of beach and you’re set. You can play in teams, and it seems to amuse everyone from the preschoolers right on up to those carrying AARP cards.

5. Traditions — It’s simple, and maybe even corny, but the best part of beach week is that it is a family tradition, one that is the highlight of my kids’ year. They love the beach and the pool, of course, but it’s mostly a week with cousins that makes it so fun. My son, 9, has started to reminisce about what he loves: the bunk beds, the pan of homemade lasagna my cousin’s wife brings along for the first night’s dinner, the chance to check out my cousin’s guitars, the “wave bashing” games in the ocean. “I can’t wait until we go to the beach and see everyone,” he said the other day, with genuine sincerity. “I just love them so much.”

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Find more advice for moms at http://orlandosentinel.com/momsatwork

Aug
02

Take 5 — Moms find ways to take a break

Posted by besttech

Susan Callahan, Anne Nolan and Katrin Schumann McClatchy Tribune

The following is an excerpt from “Mothers Need Time-Outs, Too” by Susan Callahan, Anne Nolan and Katrin Schumann (copyright 2008). Reprinted with permission from The McGraw-Hill Companies, www.mhprofessional.com.

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The reality of our lives as mothers — whether we stay-at-home or work, have one kid or five, are old pros at childrearing or new to the game — is that we’ve all experienced the daily frustrations of not having enough time to do things properly, of being stretched so thin that we snap and complain. Sometimes we’ll go for days, weeks, months — even years in some cases — operating this way, wondering why we feel so little joy in our lives.

Many of us have to be pushed to the limits of our health and happiness before we understand that downtime isn’t a luxury we need once in a blue moon, but a frequent necessity.

So what do we really mean when we say downtime? We’re not talking about those rushed moments, crammed in between the stuff of our lives. We’re suggesting you actually give yourself a time-out — from 10 minutes, to an hour, to a day — when:

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Jul
30

Can books be saved?

Posted by besttech

Aisha Sultan St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When I was in grade school, I once was grounded — from reading. I probably was being punished for not cleaning up my room. I was in the middle of a novel, and I was reading at all the family meals, in the bathroom and late at night in bed.

So, my parents took away the thing that hurt the most — my book.

When my little ones start misbehaving, I threaten to turn off the television. It works every time, but it also makes me sad. I’ve read to them since they were born. I taught my daughter to read when she was 4. Some days we’ll spend an hour cuddled up in bed with a stack of their favorite books. We have mounds of books in nearly every room of the house, and only two television sets. But, so far, they’ve shown the TV a lot more love.

It makes me wonder: Are parents passing on their love of reading to their children?

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Jul
28

Welcome to the world, Baby Blackberry!

Posted by besttech

Julie DC METRO MOMS BLOG

I’m now officially a mother of four. I know, I know, I’ve totally overpopulated this world. Blame it on my innate sense of American consumerism and need for consumption. But I had to have a fourth.

But I didn’t realize how much I wanted her until she came into my life just a little over 27 hours ago, and one day ahead of schedule. I’m already madly in love with her. She’s so tiny, weighing just shy of four ounces. Her little digits are a scrumptious sight. How did I survive all of these years without her? Why didn’t anyone tell me how much I’d come to need her. Well, I guess maybe a few of you mentioned it.

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Jul
23

Organize your life online for less than $10 a month

Posted by Alicia Castelli

What started out as an online tool to help provide structure and organization for families challenged by ADHD is now proving effective for ALL kids and families nationwide. At NannyCircle.com, entire families can manage their schedules while specifically addressing the needs of the children.

Both the parent and the child are given their own rooms in Nanny’s house that are
full of tools for daily living. NannysCircle.com allows families to set up weekly routines and tasks and mark them off when the child completes them. As the child completes daily tasks, Nanny Points are awarded. These points can be spent on virtual decorations for their room, fun games, toys, and personalized coupons that can be printed and redeemed for prizes in Nanny’s Store. In addition, children can be issued consequences for incomplete work or misbehavior. This easy system of
reinforcement motivates children to manage their lives and have fun doing it. Custom animation moves forward as the child makes progress, and personalized trophies can even be awarded upon goal completions.

New features like a homework section and an online social community will be added soon. Nannyscircle.com is $9.95 per month for unlimited use for up to 3 family members (1 parent and 2 children). A total of 6 children in one family can be added at any time.

Jul
21

These boots are made for nursing

Posted by besttech

Marty DEEP SOUTH MOMS BLOG

For the past 10 years, I have typically been on a stage. Speaking, playing, singing or presenting, I was used to needing to look my best. I was comfortable in a suit. I was comfortable in the lights.

Today, I stay at home. I work, but I stay at home. I raise my son. I am a mother.

I wear capri pants. With cargo pockets. And usually a Life Is Good T-shirt. I am stylin’.

The mom look isn’t something I ever imagined myself sporting, but it is definitely my fashion statement as of late. My friend Tonya calls it, “classy casual.” We trade e-mails on REI sales, and simply gaze longingly at the newest Fleuvog boots.

Should I have to be one or the other?

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Jul
21

Moms aren’t the only ones looking for balance

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Cindy Krischer Goodman McClatchy Newspapers

MIAMI — Larry Kellogg says the juggle of acing exams, bringing home a paycheck and raising a family 30 years ago still ranks as the most challenging time in his life. It inspired him to set up a scholarship for other fathers working their way through law school.

Kellogg wants to help a new breed of working fathers, with new priorities.

Some are dubious that fathers would help other men with their lives. Clearly, women are pushing the policy changes and family-friendly programs that have landed companies on the Working Mothers list of Best Places to Work. But fathers seeking a better work-life balance are creating change, in more subtle ways.

They are colleagues who donate personal leave for another in need. They are role models who create workplaces where flexible work schedules and telecommuting becomes doable. They are entrepreneurs who start Daddy blogs and online support groups. And, they are fathers who help others shake off the long-standing pressure to get ahead at all costs.

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